Publications

November 11 2011

The new StAR and OECD study shows that financial gains from bribery can be accurately calculated and confiscated. The study draws on cases from six countries to show several methods of quantification that are already in use, and challenges the commonly-held perception that calculating the gains made by bribe-paying companies is too complicated.

This publication was written by a project team composed of Klaudijo Stroligo (Team Leader), Ching-Lung Hsu and Theo Kouts. It is based on the joint study by the World Bank, Egmont Group, and United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime—Global Programme against Money Laundering (UNODC GPML) on Financial Intelligence Units (FIUs) Working with Law Enforcement Authorities and Prosecutors.

StAR Annual Report: In 2017, StAR celebrated its ten-year anniversary with remarkable progress in the asset recovery realm. Download full report in PDF.

The international community is well placed to make significant progress in asset recovery. National authorities have made some progress in developing the institutional and legal structures foreseen under the United Nations Convention against Corruption.

International Partnerships on Asset Recovery: Overview and Global Directory of Networks
January 18 2019

This directory lists the asset recovery networks, along with information about their structure and operations, and contact details.

Public Office, Private Interests: Accountability through Income and Asset Disclosure
March 28 2012

The first global study of financial disclosure laws and practices calls for a renewed commitment to income and asset disclosure to deter the use of public office for private gain, and to help manage actual and apparent conflicts of interest in the public sector. The study also shows that asset disclosure systems are more effective when there is a credible threat that violations will be detected and punished.

Management of Returned Assets: Policy Considerations
October 12 2009
The recovery of stolen assets raises a series of policy questions about how to use the returned funds to support development goals and how to keep the public informed. Success in managing returned assets builds confidence in public institutions and reinforces the rule of law. This note provides policymakers with an analytical framework for addressing the key management issues they will face. National authorities are encouraged to start planning early, while the asset recovery process is still ongoing. In 2017, UNODC published an updated publication on this subject: Effective Management and...
The Puppet Masters: How the Corrupt Use Legal Structures to Hide Stolen Assets and What to Do About It
October 24 2011
Authors:

This new StAR report examines how bribes, embezzled state assets and other criminal proceeds are being hidden via legal structures – shell companies, foundations, trusts and others. The study also provides policy makers with practical recommendations on how to step up ongoing international efforts to uncover flows of criminal funds and prevent criminals from misusing shell companies and other legal entities. 

Authors:

This guide features an unprecedented collection of data accompanied by an analysis of key implementation challenges to help countries develop more effective and robust financial disclosure systems.

Authors:

Countries have increasingly used settlements — any procedure short of a full trial— to conclude foreign bribery, imposing billions in monetary sanctions. But what happens to the money associated with settlements? And what can be done to help those harmed by foreign bribery...