Publications

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Identifies the key concepts - legal, operational and practical - a procedure that provides for the seizure and forfeiture of of stolen assets without the need for a criminal conviction.

Asset Recovery Handbook: A Guide for Practitioners
January 3 2011
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Developing countries lose between $20 billion and $40 billion each year to bribery, embezzlement, and other corrupt practices. Over the past 15 years only $5 billion has been recovered and returned. A new handbook seeks to help close this gap. The Asset Recovery Handbook, produced by the Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR) of the World Bank Group and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), provides practitioners with a how-to guide for recovering stolen assets.

Barriers to Asset Recovery: An Analysis of the Key Barriers and Recommendations for Action
June 21 2011
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Barriers to Asset Recovery, released on June 21, 2011 by the World Bank Group and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime’s (UNODC) Stolen Asset Recovery Initiative (StAR), advises policy makers on reforms that will enable the recovery of stolen assets. Drawing on consultations with over 50 practitioners around the globe, the study identifies challenges to asset recovery, and recommends eight strategic actions and best practices for policy makers, legislators and practitioners. It is a powerful tool that will help policy makers design a comprehensive strategy for recovering the proceeds of corruption in their countries.

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Corruption has a devastating impact on developing and transition countries, with estimates of $20 billion to $40 billion per year stolen by public officials, a figure equivalent to 20 to 40 percent of official development assistance flows.

This publication was written by a project team composed of Klaudijo Stroligo (Team Leader), Ching-Lung Hsu and Theo Kouts. It is based on the joint study by the World Bank, Egmont Group, and United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime—Global Programme against Money Laundering (UNODC GPML) on Financial Intelligence Units (FIUs) Working with Law Enforcement Authorities and Prosecutors.

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This guide features an unprecedented collection of data accompanied by an analysis of key implementation challenges to help countries develop more effective and robust financial disclosure systems.

November 11 2011

The new StAR and OECD study shows that financial gains from bribery can be accurately calculated and confiscated. The study draws on cases from six countries to show several methods of quantification that are already in use, and challenges the commonly-held perception that calculating the gains made by bribe-paying companies is too complicated.

International Partnerships on Asset Recovery: Overview and Global Directory of Networks
January 18 2019

This directory lists the asset recovery networks, along with information about their structure and operations, and contact details.

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Countries have increasingly used settlements — any procedure short of a full trial— to conclude foreign bribery, imposing billions in monetary sanctions. But what happens to the money associated with settlements? And what can be done to help those harmed by foreign bribery...

Management of Returned Assets: Policy Considerations
October 12 2009
The recovery of stolen assets raises a series of policy questions about how to use the returned funds to support development goals and how to keep the public informed. Success in managing returned assets builds confidence in public institutions and reinforces the rule of law. This note provides policymakers with an analytical framework for addressing the key management issues they will face. National authorities are encouraged to start planning early, while the asset recovery process is still ongoing. In 2017, UNODC published an updated publication on this subject: Effective Management and...